G16  E16 Schedule 1984 - 1997
STATUS-INACTIVE                           
A declassified Polish document reveals details of G16 and E16.
G 16 "Bravo Juliet" caught on 9065 kHz at 2030 UTC on 29 APR 1984 (James C in USA)
G 16 Bravo Juliet 
Part of a recording from Peter H. in Germany

G16 - Peter H. 
From Jochen Schafer in Germany.
Alpha Kilo on 8173 kHz from 5 NOV 81
Zulu Papa
on 8063 kHz from AUG 89 
Lima Uniform 1970s style    Lima Uniform 1980s style    Lima Uniform 1990s style
          11545 kHz                     11545 kHz                          13782 kHz
BND Delta Mike from Leen in NL. via spook 007
BND Yankee Bravo from Leen in NL. via spook007
From Jochen S. in Germany. 
Yankee Bravo   Papa Lima  Papa Zulu  Papa Golf 
My own sound files follow:
Alpha Lima
Alpha Uniform
Alpha Uniform (dual transmission)
Bravo Lima
Bravo November
Charlie Delta
Delta Alpha
Delta Mike
Echo Hotel 
Echo Lima 
Foxtrot Sierra
Hotel Kilo
Juliet Whisky
Kilo Golf
Lima Golf
Lima Romeo
Lima Uniform
Mike Delta
November Lima
November Uniform
Papa Delta
Romeo Delta
Romeo Kilo
Sierra Bravo + E3 (11545)
Victor Bravo
Victor India
Victor Oscar
Whisky Lima
X Ray Lima
Yankee Bravo
Yankee Sierra
----------------------------------------------------

CALL SIGNS
AB- 804, 299, 531
AL- 042, 969, 023
AM- 119, 791
AO 142, 113
AU- 600,349, 244, 385, 006, 554, 691, 214, 192
AU- 942 (English)
BE- 558, 903
BI- 191, 721
BJ - 358, 591, 152, 870
BL- 139, 448, 257 (English)
BN- (English)
BU- 608,073, 492
CD -059, 432, 707, 162, 262, 622, 711
CI- **444, 555, 666, 888, 780
CN - 158, 430, 005, 831, 189
CT - 884*465, 223, 286, 032
DA- 034 (English)
DB- 038, 329, 848
DF-281, 718
DL--131 (English)
DM- 214 (English)
DO -167 (English)
DT - 809, 015, 503, 991, 686, 062
EB - 528, 362
EG- 472, 795, 267, 823, 680
EH- 437(English)
EL- 611, 236, 147, 928. 510, 063, 490, 236
ER- 573, 885
FB- 009, 382, 653, 361
FK - 207 (English)
FP- 081
FR- 043
FS- 099, 361, 816
GC- 082, 808, 334
GK -856, 316, 571, 386, 477, 740, 846
GZ- 628, 803, 285
HK- 393, 621, 328, 003, 373, 921
HS - 639, 344, 961
IT- 139, 525
JB- 606, 995, 239
JD - 534, 802
JO - unknown
JU- 271, 667, 499
JW- 521, 081,123, 542, 824, 818
KG- 408, 390
KR -737, 171, 157
KW- 884, 091, 908, 513, 023, 417, 568, 920
LA- 873, 355, 363
LD - 482, 677, 146
LE- 633, 910, 262
LG- 224, 484, 761
LR- unknown
LU- 998, 031, 456
MD -017, 241, 331, 296, 565, 221, 850
MH- 013, 255, 604
MN - 628
NL- unknown
NU - 264, 599, 368, 526
NZ- 202, 649, 955
OA - 122, 820, 039
OK- 319, 617, 812
PB- 917, 263, 709
PD -054, 551, 301
PG-
217, 424, 732
PJ - unknown
PL- 855, 131, 679
PN- Many
PT - 118, 551
PZ - 143, 625, 374, 411
QL- 410, 028
RD -041, 116, 208, 457, 520, 914
RK- 104,702 (English)
RO- 941, 098, 660
SB- 527, 962, 498, 174, 613
ST- 481, 755
TE-460, 103
TP- 004, 975, 738, 696
UF- 234, 655, 049
UG - unknown
UI- 443, 778
UL -137, 781, 218
VI - 101 (English)
VO -141, 283, 507
VB- 088, 415, 697
WL- 115, 522, 026, 005, 831
WP- 989, 716
XA - 331
XL- 381, 427, 610
YB - 042, 979, 676
YS- 635, 516, 027, 907
ZB- 589, 926, 203
ZG- 763, 405
ZO- 209, 391, 475, 681
ZP -505, 125, 703
ZT- 250, 863

2 LETTER STATIONS (G16/E16) :
             Frequencies used (kHz)

2690/2707/2745/3228/3262/4543/4594/4773/4821/4888/5015/5182
5284/5732/5770/6370/6765/6853/7407/7532/7661/7740/7752/7858
8063/8173/9040/9325/9450/10170/10177/10460/10500/10740/11108/
11545/11617/12092/12210/12314/13362/13413/13752/13775/13890
14622/14945/15610/16055/16220/16414/17430/18195/18575/19295
19755/20240/20350/20675/22885

 

Here is a case of "where to begin?" There are over 80 callsigns on nearly 40 different frequencies, all of which indicates a very big set-up. I can recall hearing these transmissions in the early 1970's and they certainly date back further than that. I remember tuning into a station in 1971 and being almost hypnotised by the strange interval signal (it is a different one now). It consisted of a female voice repeating "Papa November" over and over continuously with a sort of snake charmer's flute playing in the background. This went on for five minutes, after which a woman would start sending messages in five figure groups.

When I started to actively listen to number stations this was one of the first I studied. It is unique in that it broadcasts on four frequencies at the same time, but not simultaneously. By this I mean that there is a time lag between the four frequencies. It is as though four different machines are started, one after the other. Until 1989 real female voices were used, that is, a woman would be giving a list of German five figure numbers and she would sit down and read the whole thing out into a tape recorder. The tape could then be transmitted at the appropriate time. At the time of eventual conversion to a voice synthesiser machine, four different women were being employed in the mind-numbing career of number reading. More about them later.

The frequencies used are 2707, 5015, 7404 and 11108.

 The choice of frequencies is interesting as it ensures that at least one will be propagated at any given time. As it happens, the schedule is designed to give a wide geographic coverage. The station transmits every day, even at Christmas, at 0000, 0030, 0600, 0630, 1200, 1230, 1800 and 1830. The transmissions on the hour are in the AM mode, whereas the broadcasts on the half hour are all in upper sideband. These data suggest that maybe a world-wide operation is in force. After all, a station that transmits on four frequencies every six hours using both AM and USB is trying to get its messages through at any cost.

On the whole this operation is very professional. The broadcasts begin precisely on the hour or half hour and very few mistakes are made. It is not totally perfect however. Here are two errors that have been noted: (1) when the stations were being converted to auto-voice on a few occasions both live voice and auto-voice messages were being sent out on the same transmission. It was as though no one had told the female readers that they were being replaced by machines. They carried on, broadcasting on top of the auto-voice, thus making the whole transmission unintelligible. (2) On another occasion a sister station (DFD37 which is part of the same set-up - see below -) was being sent out over Papa November frequencies instead of its normal channel of 3370.

This was final proof, if any was needed, that thy are all part of the same organisation. As will be shown later there could be some doubt about this. After all, DFC37 is, on the face of it, a legitimate callsign of the Federal German Republic (formerly West Germany). Indeed, certain publications have this and its twin, DFD21, in their listings as legitimate stations. Anyway, back to Papa November: as shown, the station is pivotal to whatever agency operates it and the format it uses reflects this.

This is unique amongst number stations. As with other set ups, a 3 figure identifier is used, followed by a group count. The difference is in the daily workings of the station. Papa November has allocated to it a series of 3 figure identifiers which are specific to the station and are not used by any of the other stations in the network. After the callsign is sent a woman sends out the list of identifiers/group count, like this:

PN 1800 25 JUL91:
824 4
695 13
771 11
372 12
525 10
717 8

824, for example, is the identifier and 4 is the number of groups. This is said as
"824 824 4 gruppen, 695 695 13 gruppen", etc. After the last heading the message for
824 would be sent which, in this case, is four groups of five figures, e.g. "12334, 12334,
89856, 89856, 29964, 29964, 13277, 13277 ende. Achtung! 695 695 13 gruppen" and so
on. Now, this represents one transmission (at 1800 on 25 July, 1991). The next day a
new message may have appeared. It will take the first place on the rota of messages, like this:
(new message)

543 12
824 4
695 13
771 11
372 12
524 10

Note also that the last message on the previous day's rota has dropped off the bottom.
If we look at the rota for several days the picture becomes clearer:

SUN      MON     TUE    WED     THU       FRI      SAT     SUN

997 11  717 12   233 17  622 10  117 11   697 9    335 12   477 12
524 8   977 11   717 12   233 17  622 10   117 11  697 9    335 12
543 11  524 8    997 11   717 12  233 17   622 10  117 11   697 9
771 22  543 11   524 8    997 11  717 12   233 17  622 10  117 11
825 7    771 22   543 11  524 8    997 11   717 12  233 17  622 10
372 16  825 7     771 22  543 11  524 8     997 11  717 12  233 17
543 11  543 11   543 11  543 11

New messages appear daily and the old ones are discarded. This is not always the case, however. Notice the message 543 11. It is stuck on the bottom of the rota for a few days, perhaps for as long as three weeks. Also, message 233 17 joins it at the end. This sort of thing is a regular occurrence. Presumably the message is retained on the rota until the agent contacts the senders to say that the message has been copied. Then the heading will finally disappear from the rota.

 Certain identifiers have a tendency to stay around for a long time. For example, 543 messages can stay on a rota for several weeks. Maybe agent 543 or whomever cannot acknowledge easily so the message has to be repeated over a period of time. Traffic analysis is easy with this station as the number of messages changes considerably. Sometimes there may be only five messages, at other times perhaps ten. Here is a selection of headings and group counts sent over the last few years. Perhaps the changes in traffic relate to events in the real world.

Note: The three figure number is the addressee, the one or two figures after the addressee is the group count.

21MAR90           16APR90     16MAY90       21JUN90       19AUG90      2DEC90
683 6                 706 8          853 6            351 7          269 10      352 15
462 11               321 15        307 35          974 9          564 8        563 14
383 7                 178 2          923 10         156 12        133 6         868 12
318 12                084 6          321 9           064 18        620 9        935 11
096 8                 464 11         243 12         541 13        713 7        736 7
484 11               997 8           582 7           572 13
948 5                 563 4          494 8
825 23               688 16
307 19               825 10

Note how the traffic varies. Also, some of the messages consist solely of two-five figure groups. For 20APR91 the traffic for addressee 484 was only 48285 and 36187. It is difficult to imagine what the purpose of such a brief message might be.

Addressees: Here are all of the addresses used by Papa November. The number of different addressees will give some idea of the scale of this station compared to other stations in the same organisation.

007/0 18/040/046/052/057/064/078/084/092/096
109/1 12/126/133/144/156/160/174/178/179/18 1/197
212/217/219/220/23 1/233/238/243/269/275/280/293
307/312/318/321/337/348/351/352/367/372/376/383/399
406/422/438/448/462/464/468/479/484/487/491/494
525/535/541/543/544/552/563/564/569/572/58 1/585/587/595
602/6 16/620/637/657/669/678/683/687/688/690/695
706/713/717/725/736/749/765/771/799
805/809/825/843/849/853/868/877/88 1/887/891
905/9 16/923/927/935/948/965/966/974/994/997

TWO-LETTER GERMAN

As we have seen, Papa November uses four frequencies and DFC37/DFD21 use one each. The other members of this set-up use many frequencies in the 2.0 to 30 MHz range. There are many different callsigns, each of which has its own three figure identifier, although nowhere near as many as Papa November. The format is similar to Papa November. The woman repeats two letters from the international phonetic alphabet four times, after which random electronic tones are played for a few seconds. This goes on for five minutes after which the woman gives the three figure identifier and then the group count. Example:

"Yankee Sierra" 4 times, electronic tones (5 minutes, repeated), "635 635 27
gruppen. 516 516 78 gruppen. Achtung, 635 63527 gruppen." Into five figure text.

There are, strangely enough, one or two English language versions of these stations. Those noted so far are "Romeo Kilo", "Juliet Oscar" and "Delta Oscar". The woman announcer on these says "Message for 167, 167 88 groups. Attention!", and then goes into the five figure message. The English variant, apart from being very seldom heard (at least in Europe), is unusually faint and distant-sounding, as though the transmitter site is not on the European continent.

The woman's voice has an oriental accent, not German at all. This may suggest that the activities of the organisation behind this station have a world-wide involvement. My own theory is this: DFC37 and DFD21 are aimed at personnel in Western Europe. The times of the broadcasts (afternoons and evenings in Europe), the frequencies used (3370 and 4010) and the large number of addresses seem to back this up. These signals are not readily heard outside of Europe so this would seem to be the case. The traffic is fairly substantial; each addressee has between 20 and 50 five figure groups in each message.

Papa November would seem to be a general alert broadcast. The low five figure group counts (2 to 20) mean little information can be sent to the agent. The message would seem to be on the nature of "Pick up a message at (place)" or "Tune into a broadcast at..." The real information would be sent by all the other two letter stations world-wide as their group counts are always about 100 groups in total.

The suggestion of a world-wide operation is backed up by the frequencies used. 19295 at 1400 is not a combination meant to be heard in Europe. Also, certain stations never appear below about 10 MHz, while others keep below 10 MHz. This would suggest that "Bravo Uniform", for example, which never appears below 10 MHz is meant for agents outside Europe. Similarly, Yankee Sierra", which never broadcasts above 8 MHz, is meant for agents closer to Europe.

The 2 letter stations have been heard at every hour and half hour during the 24 hours in a day. The vast majority broadcast between 1800-2000 suggesting that the recipients of the messages are located mainly in Europe.